Must-Try Traditional Pinoy Food to Challenge Your Palate: Part 1

Traditional Pinoy Food

The Philippines is known for its beautiful landscape, dreamy beaches, and hospitable people, but if you’re a foreigner dreaming of visiting this little piece of paradise, you should get your hands on traditional Pinoy food; after all, food is the best way to immerse in a culture, right?

Here are delicious Filipino dishes you should definitely try.

Traditional Pinoy Food You Need to Have a Taste Of

See videos at the end

Lechon Manok

Lechon Manok

The street version of roasted chicken, lechon manok is the kind of food that you can’t help but eat. They are sold absolutely everywhere and stores are usually open early in the evening. This traditional Pinoy food is best served for dinner or pulutan (food you munch on while drinking).

Price: ₱150 ($3)

Puto Bumbong

Puto Bumbong

A traditional Christmas treat, puto bumbong is sticky rice with a purple color (traditional Filipino flavor called ube or purple yam), served with butter or margarine and topped with grated coconut and sugar.

Price: ₱25 ($0.5)

Bibingka

Bibingka

Another popular Christmas delicacy is the bibingka. The egg-based dessert is eaten alongside the puto bumbong, and they are the warm treats that Santa Claus would have loved better than cookies and milk.

Price: ₱40 ($1)

Sisig

Sisig

For those who have weak tummies, you may want to skip this, but you’d be missing half your life if you do. Pork sisig is made of chopped pig’s face and ears and sometimes have chicken liver with it. It’s usually spicy, as it is seasoned with red chili peppers and calamansi (golden lime). This traditional Pinoy food is best to go with ice-cold beer. Yum!

Price: ₱50 ($1)

Halo-Halo

Halo-Halo

If there is a traditional summer dessert, it’s halo-halo, which literally means “mixed”. It is shaved ice with milk and a mix of sweet fruits and other ingredients like sweet corn, coconut, sweet beans, and more. It’s a bit overwhelming, but refreshing once you get used to it.

Price: ₱30–₱70 ($1–$2)

Palabok

Palabok

Filipinos love noodles too, and this noodle dish has everything you want to be on a plate: cooked shrimps in shrimp sauce, bits of pork, crushed fried pork skin (chicharon), and fried garlic. Filipinos love this so much that we eat this at any time of the day, may it be breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snacks in between.

Price: ₱40–₱80 ($1–$2)

Pancit

Pancit

The pancit is another noodle dish mixed with pork, chicken, and vegetables. Like the palabok, it can be eaten at any time of the day, but people love it best for breakfast or merienda (afternoon snack).

Fun fact: this is always present in birthday parties or even dinners, because traditionally, Filipinos use it as a metaphor for long life.

Price: ₱25 ($0.5)

Adobo

Abodo

Pork or chicken marinated with vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, and cooked with bay leaf. It is one of the most famous dishes in the country, and it is served differently in different regions, so you should not miss out on this. It may seem easy to cook, but it’s a delight to your taste buds.

Price: ₱40–₱60 pesos ($1–$2)

Read the second part of this article here.

Watch the videos below

 

 

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